What Does It Mean When Your Taxes Are Being Reviewed?

If you’re wondering what it means when your taxes are being reviewed, you’re not alone. Many people feel anxious when they get a notice from the IRS saying their taxes are under review.

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What does it mean when your taxes are being reviewed?

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) conducts reviews of tax returns for a variety of reasons. The IRS may review your return if it was selected for examination randomly or because it met certain criteria, such as math errors or income levels that differ from those of similar taxpayers.

If your return is selected for review, the IRS will send you a notice explaining the reason for the review and requesting additional information. You should respond to the notice promptly and completely to avoid delays in processing your return.

If you disagree with the IRS’s determinations, you have the right to appeal. The appeals process is informal and allows you to present your case to an impartial reviewer.

The process of tax review

The process of tax review can be initiated by the IRS in a number of ways. Sometimes, the IRS will automatically review a return because it was filed incorrectly or it triggers certain red flags. Other times, the agency may select a return for review through its audits program.

If you are selected for a tax review, the IRS will send you a notice in the mail informing you of the situation. The notice will explain why your return was selected and will give you instructions on how to proceed.

In most cases, a tax review simply involves the IRS asking for additional information about your return. For example, if you claims certain deductions or credits, the IRS may ask for documentation to support your claims. As long as you are able to provide the requested information, the review should not result in any additional taxes or penalties.

However, in some cases, a tax review can lead to an audit. An audit is a more thorough examination of your return and usually results in additional taxes and penalties if discrepancies are found. If you are selected for an audit, it is important to seek professional help to ensure that you comply with all of the requirements and avoid any potential penalties.

Why your taxes might be selected for review

Your taxes might be selected for review for a number of reasons. The IRS could select your return for an audit because it was incomplete, because you made math errors, or because your return was flagged for possible fraud. Other times, the IRS might select your return because it falls within a certain income bracket or because you claim certain deductions or credits.

If your taxes are selected for review, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you did anything wrong. However, you will need to provide additional documentation to the IRS to support your claims. This could include things like receipts, bank statements, or other records. It’s important to respond to the IRS promptly and provide all of the information they request. If you do not, you could face penalties or interest charges.

While being selected for review can be stressful, remember that it is not uncommon. If you have questions or need help communicating with the IRS, there are tax professionals who can assist you.

What to expect during a tax review

A tax review is a routine procedure conducted by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to ensure that taxpayers are correctly following the rules and regulations surrounding taxes. The review process begins when the IRS sends a notice to a taxpayer asking for additional information or documentation related to their taxes.

The taxpayer then has a set amount of time to respond to the IRS with the requested information. If the taxpayer does not respond or provide insufficient information, the IRS may move forward with an audit, which is a more in-depth review of the taxpayer’s records.

During an audit, the IRS will examine a taxpayer’s financial records in detail to determine whether they have accurately reported their income, filed the correct tax forms, and paid the appropriate amount of taxes. The auditor will also look for any evidence of fraud or non-compliance with tax laws.

If the IRS finds that a taxpayer owes additional taxes, they will send a notice informing the taxpayer of the amount owed. The taxpayer then has the option to pay the taxes owed in full or enter into an installment agreement with the IRS to make payments over time.

If you receive a notice from the IRS asking for additional information or documentation, it is important to respond as soon as possible. Failure to do so could result in an audit and potentially lead to penalties and interest charges.

How to prepare for a tax review

An IRS tax review is when the IRS takes a closer look at your tax return to make sure everything is accurate. This can happen randomly or if the IRS suspects that you may have made a mistake on your taxes.

If you are selected for a tax review, the first thing you should do is not panic. The IRS will send you a letter explaining what they need from you and how to submit it. Carefully read through the letter and follow the instructions.

You will need to gather all of the documents that the IRS has requested and send them in. It is important to note that you should only send in the requested documents and nothing else. The IRS does not need your entire tax history; they will only ask for specific documents related to their inquiry.

Once the IRS receives your documents, they will review them and determine if you owe any additional taxes. If they find that you do owe taxes, they will send you a bill for the amount due plus interest and penalties. You will have a certain amount of time to pay this bill, and if you cannot pay it in full, you should contact the IRS to set up a payment plan.

If the IRS finds that you do not owe any additional taxes, then your case will be closed and no further action will be taken.

Although it can be stressful to go through a tax review, as long as you stay organized and cooperate with the IRS, it should be a fairly painless process.

How to respond to a tax review

If you are being audited or your taxes are being reviewed, it means that the IRS or your state tax agency has questions about your tax return. They may want you to provide more information or documentation about certain items on your return.

It’s important to know that being audited or having your taxes reviewed does not necessarily mean that you did something wrong. The IRS randomly selects taxpayers for audits every year, and they may also review your return if it appears to be incorrect or if they have questions about specific items on it.

If you are being audited or your taxes are being reviewed, the first thing you should do is contact the IRS or state tax agency to find out what they need from you. Once you have gathered all of the required information or documentation, you will need to submit it to them. Depending on the outcome of the review, you may or may not owe additional taxes.

The outcomes of a tax review

A tax review can have one of three possible outcomes: no change, an adjustment, or an audit.

If the IRS finds that there were no errors on your return, then there will be no change to your tax bill and you will not owe any additional money.

If the IRS adjusts your return, you may owe additional taxes. The IRS may also issue a refund if you overpaid.

An audit is a more thorough review of your return. The IRS will contact you to schedule an appointment to discuss the results of the audit. You may be asked to provide documentation to support the information on your return.

What to do if you disagree with the results of a tax review

If you disagree with the results of a tax review, you have two options: you can eitherpay the taxes that are owed, or you can file an appeal.

If you choose to pay the taxes that are owed, you can do so by sending a check or money order to the address listed on your notice. You can also pay online or by phone using the information listed on your notice.

If you choose to file an appeal, you will need to do so within 30 days of the date of your notice. To file an appeal, you will need to send a written request to the address listed on your notice.

It is important to remember that if you choose to file an appeal, you are still responsible for paying any taxes that are owed. If you do not pay the taxes that are owed, the IRS may take collection action against you.

The appeals process for tax review

The first step in the appeals process is to file a petition with the U.S. Tax Court. This must be done within 90 days of the date on your Notice of Deficiency. The Tax Court is a court of record, which means that if you go to trial, you will have a formal record of the proceedings. This can be important if you later have to go to the U.S. Court of Appeals.

The importance of professional help during a tax review

If you’re being audited by the IRS, it’s important to have professional help on your side. Here’s what you need to know about tax reviews.

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