A Tale For The Time Being – My Review

I read A Tale For The Time Being by Ruth Ozeki and it was amazing. Here is my review of the book.

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Introduction

A Tale For The Time Being is a 2013 novel by Ruth Ozeki. It is a fascinating story that weaves together the tale of a teenage girl living in Tokyo with the story of a woman living on an island off the coast of British Columbia. The book addresses many themes, including bullying, suicide, and environmentalism. The characters are rich and complex, and the plot is captivating. I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good story.

What is A Tale For The Time Being about?

A Tale For The Time Being is a novel about a teenage girl living in Tokyo who finds a diary written by a WWII airman. The story is told from the perspective of the teenage girl and the WWII airman. The story covers the themes of war, love, family, and loss.

The characters in the novel

Ruth is a hundred and four years old. She lives on a remote island off the coast of British Columbia. She has no television, no computer, no phone. Ruth is a novelist, and she is writing a book about her life.

Nao is a sixteen-year-old girl living in Tokyo. Her mother is dead, her father is a wealthy banker, and she doesn’t fit in at school. Nao is trying to find her place in the world.

Otto is a ninety-seven-year-old man living in New York City. He is a Holocaust survivor, and he has been expecting to die for many years. When Ruth’s book arrives at his doorstep, it changes his life.

The characters in A Tale for the Time Being are complex and full of life. I found myself rooting for all of them, even when they made mistakes. I was especially impressed with the way Ozeki developed Otto’s character. I don’t want to give spoilers, but I will say that his story will stay with you long after you finish the book.

The author’s writing style

The biggest strength of A Tale For The Time Being is its writing style. The author, Ruth Ozeki, is a fantastic writer, and she really brings the story to life with her beautiful prose. The book is written in first person from the perspective of Nao, a teenage girl in Japan who is contemplating suicide. Nao is a very interesting character, and I found myself really sympathizing with her and rooting for her throughout the book.

The writing style is also very engaging and fast-paced, which made it a very quick and enjoyable read. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone looking for a good story and some beautiful writing.

The themes of the novel

Ruth Ozeki’s novel “A Tale for the Time Being” is a complex and multi-layered story that explores a vast range of themes. Ozeki expertly weaves together the lives of two very different girls living in very different worlds – 16-year-old Nao living in Tokyo in 2011 and Ruth, a novelist living on an island off the coast of British Columbia in the present day. The girls are connected by a battered old diary that washes ashore on Ruth’s beach, which tells the story of Nao’s life up to the point where she begins writing it.

The novel raises questions about time, identity, suicide, bullying, family, history, and WAR. Ozeki brilliantly weaves together these disparate themes into a cohesive and compelling story that will leave readers thinking long after they’ve finished the last page.

The setting of the novel

Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale For The Time Being follows the story of sixteen-year-old Nao, who is struggling with bullying at school and her father’s suicide. She decides to write a diary documenting her life in Tokyo in the hopes that it will be found by someone in the future. Nao also writes about her great-grandmother, a Buddhist nun living on a remote island in Canada.

The story alternates between Nao’s diary entries and the perspective of Ruth, a novelist living on the same island as the Buddhist nun. Ruth discovers Nao’s diary washed up on the shore, and becomes obsessed with finding out what happens to the girl.

A Tale For The Time Being is a complex and moving exploration of time, identity, and what it means to be human. The different settings of Tokyo and the isolated island add to the sense of dislocation and rootlessness that many of the characters feel.

The structure of the novel

Ruth Ozeki has used a very interesting technique in her novel, A Tale For The Time Being. The story is told through a series of diary entries, written by a teenage girl living in Japan. We also hear from an elderly lady living on an island off the coast of Canada. These two characters never meet, but their stories become inextricably linked.

The structure of the novel is fascinating. It jumps backwards and forwards in time, and we learn more about the characters and their lives with each new chapter. The story is sad and heart-breaking at times, but it is also full of hope and love.

I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is looking for something a little different. It is a truly beautiful story, told in a unique and compelling way.

The ending of the novel

Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale For The Time Being is a tremendously moving and nuanced novel. The story follows sixteen-year-old Nao, a girl living in Tokyo in the days leading up to and after the 2011 tsunami. Nao is a suicidal, bullied girl with a deeply troubled home life. The novel alternates between Nao’s story, told through the diary she is writing as part of her suicide plan, and that of Ruth, a novelist living on an isolated Canadian island who finds the diary washed up on her beach.

The ending of the novel is both deeply sad and incredibly hopeful. Nao’s story ends with her successful suicide attempt, but in the final pages of the novel we learn that her diary has been found and that her story has touched and changed the lives of many people, including Ruth. In spite of the tragedy of Nao’s death, the ending of the novel is ultimately optimistic and life-affirming.

My personal thoughts on the novel

I absolutely enjoyed this novel! It tells the story of a teenage girl named Ruth, who finds a diary washed up on the shore of her Canadian beach home. The diary was written by a 16-year-old Japanese girl named Nao, and it chronicles her life in Tokyo leading up to and during the 2011 tsunami.

Ruth becomes obsessed with Nao’s story, and she sets out to find her. The novel alternate between Nao’s diary entries and Ruth’s first-person narrative. I thought this was an interesting way to tell the story, and it kept me engaged throughout.

The character development was excellent, and I found myself feeling very invested in both Nao and Ruth. I would highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a good read!

Conclusion

Ruth Ozeki has crafted a fascinating, thought-provoking and beautifully written tale that will stay with you long after you have finished reading it. A Tale For The Time Being is a novel that is hard to categorize, blending elements of mystery, chick-lit, magical realism, historical fiction and family drama. It is a book that will make you laugh, cry and think, sometimes all at the same time.

Ozeki’s masterful storytelling draws the reader in from the very first page and effortlessly weaves together the lives of two very different teenage girls living on opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean. While Nao’s story is set in the present day and deals with themes of bullying, suicide and self-harm, Ruth’s story is set in the near future and deals with themes of loneliness, love and loss.

A Tale For The Time Being is a book that will speak to anyone who has ever felt like an outsider or felt like they didn’t quite belong. It is a book about hope and redemption, about second chances and new beginnings. And it is a book about the power of stories to connect us across time and space.

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